Free Plantation Shutter Plans

Free plantation shutter plans. Fiberglass awning. How to make lined drapery panels.

Free Plantation Shutter Plans

free plantation shutter plans

    plantation shutter

  • (Plantation shutters) A window shutter is a solid and stable window covering usually consisting of a frame of vertical stiles and horizontal rails (top, center and bottom).
  • (Plantation shutters) A hinged cover or screen for a window or door, usually fitted with louvres
  • the name coined by Australian Timber Shutters in the 80s for their Australian style shutter with wide adjustable blades. Now a mostly generic term for timber shutters.

    plans

  • (Plan) This shows the ground plan design, elevation of house, number and size of rooms, kitchen, bathrooms, laundry layout and position of the house on the land.
  • Design or make a plan of (something to be made or built)
  • (401(K)plan) A qualified profit-sharing or thrift plan that allows eligible employees the option of putting moneyinto the plan or receiving the funds as cash.
  • Decide on and arrange in advance
  • (plan) A debtor’s detailed description of how the debtor proposes to pay creditors’ claims over a fixed period of time.
  • Make preparations for an anticipated event or time

    free

  • Without cost or payment
  • With the sheets eased
  • loose: without restraint; “cows in India are running loose”
  • grant freedom to; free from confinement
  • able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; “free enterprise”; “a free port”; “a free country”; “I have an hour free”; “free will”; “free of racism”; “feel free to stay as long as you wish”; “a free choice”

free plantation shutter plans – Blinds, Plantation

Blinds, Plantation Shutters And Window Treatments
Blinds, Plantation Shutters And Window Treatments
There are many styles of curtains, shades, valances and other window treatments that you can use to dress your windows. Dressed windows add to the charm of your house and make it look gorgeous. The key is to keep things in balance rather than overpower the space with too many contrasting colors. Window treatments can cost a mint these days, especially if the person doing the decorating would like to find something which is not only practical but also aesthetically pleasing. You can create your own window treatment with ideas from the internet, your local library, a craft shop or even book stores. All you need to do the job are a few supplies and a little patience, and if you know how to sew then it’s an added advantage.

Carry On Reading …… Get Your Copy Now …….

There are many styles of curtains, shades, valances and other window treatments that you can use to dress your windows. Dressed windows add to the charm of your house and make it look gorgeous. The key is to keep things in balance rather than overpower the space with too many contrasting colors. Window treatments can cost a mint these days, especially if the person doing the decorating would like to find something which is not only practical but also aesthetically pleasing. You can create your own window treatment with ideas from the internet, your local library, a craft shop or even book stores. All you need to do the job are a few supplies and a little patience, and if you know how to sew then it’s an added advantage.

Carry On Reading …… Get Your Copy Now …….

James L. and Lucinda Bedell House

James L. and Lucinda Bedell House
Tottenville, Staten Island

Constructed between 1869 and 1874, the James L .and Lucinda Bedell House is a fine example of the free-standing Second-Empire style residence and, until it was altered in March 2005, was the best preserved house in the style on Staten Island’s South Shore. Second Empire houses once proliferated on the South Shore, where the popularity of the style coincided with a period of growth tied to the opening of the Staten Island Railroad, but they are now becoming increasingly rare. Designed in what was at the time a very up-to-date version of the style, the Bedell House was handsomely proportioned and carefully detailed.

It is the only architecturally distinguished Second Empire frame house in Tottenville that retains its historic form and clapboard siding, The house features such historic details as molded window surrounds, cornices, scrolled brackets, and a two-story polygonal bay enriched by recessed panels and molded cornices. The imposing flared mansard roof that extends over the main portion of the house has segmental arched dormers with molded hoods. The rear two-story wing has a low gabled roof capped by a molded cornice.

James Bedell was part of a prominent family that settled on Staten Island in the eighteenth century. His eldest brother, Isaac P. Bedell, was one of the island’s leading carpenter-builders and the founder of the oldest surviving undertaking business in New York City, established in 1841. James Bedell was also a carpenter and cabinet maker and by the 1870s, when this house was built, specialized in making window blinds and sash. It seems likely that he or his brother Isaac was responsible for the design and construction of this house.

By the 1890s James Bedell also established an undertaking business and this house began to be used as a funeral home. In the 1920s, it was acquired by architect Chester Abram Cole. A leader in the architectural profession on Staten Island, Cole was associated with the nationally prominent firm of Carrere & Hastings prior to entering the firm of the well-known Staten Island architect James Whitford. Cole is probably best known for his work in restoring the Conference House, a designated New York City Landmark. The Bedell House remained in residential use until 2005.

Shortly prior to and after the building was calendared for public hearing on March 29, 2005, the owner removed historic fabric and details.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

History of Tottenville

Tottenville is located at the southwestern tip of Staten Island at the most southerly point in New York City and New York State. It was an important habitation and burial site for many Native Americans whose remains have been found in abundance at Ward’s Point. The first European settler, Captain Christopher Billopp, an English naval officer, received a patent for 932 acres from the Duke of York in 1688. Billopp built a two-story stone house overlooking Raritan Bay around 1675. In 1687, Billopp’s plantation was enlarged to 1,600 acres and given the title “Bentley Manor.” By 1700, he had begun operating a ferry across the Arthur Kill to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, part of the land and water route that once connected New York City and Philadelphia. Billopp’s heirs, who had actively supported the British during the Revolution, lost this huge property when it was confiscated by State of New York following the war.

Partitioned and sold, the former Billopp property continued to be used largely for farming as well as a base for fishing and related maritime activities. Gradually a hamlet formed around the ferry landing and Amboy Road, the path leading to it, and scattered houses were built along the shore. This settlement soon came to be known as Tottenville, after a prominent family that had erected a wharf, Totten’s Landing, and were instrumental in starting Bethel Methodist Church. Tottenville’s “waterfront flourished in the early nineteenth century as freight and passenger boats docked there on their way to Manhattan.” The village became a major center for shipbuilding producing many “vessels of large tonnage” each year. Hundreds of inhabitants were also engaged in the oyster trade. The ferry connections also prompted the development of small summer resorts, restaurants, hotels, and other recreation businesses.

In 1860, Tottenville became the western terminus for the new Staten Island Railroad, establishing an important link between the developing village and the rest of the island. This spurred the growth of the commerce in the village. According to the Handbook and Business Directory of Staten Island, published in 1870, “many handsome dwellings and stores” were erected and “evidences of [the village’s] prosperity were visible in all its surroundings.” During the subsequent decade, the Tottenville post office was established and the village was officially incorporated, the only one chartered on the island’s southern and western sections. The v

James L. and Lucinda Bedell House

James L. and Lucinda Bedell House
134 Main Street, Tottenville, Staten Island, New York City, New York

Constructed between 1869 and 1874, the James L .and Lucinda Bedell House is a fine example of the free-standing Second-Empire style residence and, until it was altered in March 2005, was the best preserved house in the style on Staten Island’s South Shore. Second Empire houses once proliferated on the South Shore, where the popularity of the style coincided with a period of growth tied to the opening of the Staten Island Railroad, but they are now becoming increasingly rare. Designed in what was at the time a very up-to-date version of the style, the Bedell House was handsomely proportioned and carefully detailed.

It is the only architecturally distinguished Second Empire frame house in Tottenville that retains its historic form and clapboard siding, The house features such historic details as molded window surrounds, cornices, scrolled brackets, and a two-story polygonal bay enriched by recessed panels and molded cornices. The imposing flared mansard roof that extends over the main portion of the house has segmental arched dormers with molded hoods. The rear two-story wing has a low gabled roof capped by a molded cornice.

James Bedell was part of a prominent family that settled on Staten Island in the eighteenth century. His eldest brother, Isaac P. Bedell, was one of the island’s leading carpenter-builders and the founder of the oldest surviving undertaking business in New York City, established in 1841. James Bedell was also a carpenter and cabinet maker and by the 1870s, when this house was built, specialized in making window blinds and sash. It seems likely that he or his brother Isaac was responsible for the design and construction of this house.

By the 1890s James Bedell also established an undertaking business and this house began to be used as a funeral home. In the 1920s, it was acquired by architect Chester Abram Cole. A leader in the architectural profession on Staten Island, Cole was associated with the nationally prominent firm of Carrere & Hastings prior to entering the firm of the well-known Staten Island architect James Whitford. Cole is probably best known for his work in restoring the Conference House, a designated New York City Landmark. The Bedell House remained in residential use until 2005.

Shortly prior to and after the building was calendared for public hearing on March 29, 2005, the owner removed historic fabric and details.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

History of Tottenville

Tottenville is located at the southwestern tip of Staten Island at the most southerly point in New York City and New York State. It was an important habitation and burial site for many Native Americans whose remains have been found in abundance at Ward’s Point. The first European settler, Captain Christopher Billopp, an English naval officer, received a patent for 932 acres from the Duke of York in 1688. Billopp built a two-story stone house overlooking Raritan Bay around 1675. In 1687, Billopp’s plantation was enlarged to 1,600 acres and given the title “Bentley Manor.” By 1700, he had begun operating a ferry across the Arthur Kill to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, part of the land and water route that once connected New York City and Philadelphia. Billopp’s heirs, who had actively supported the British during the Revolution, lost this huge property when it was confiscated by State of New York following the war. Partitioned and sold, the former Billopp property continued to be used largely for farming as well as a base for fishing and related maritime activities. Gradually a hamlet formed around the ferry landing and Amboy Road, the path leading to it, and scattered houses were built along the shore. This settlement soon came to be known as Tottenville, after a prominent family that had erected a wharf, Totten’s Landing, and were instrumental in starting Bethel Methodist Church. Tottenville’s “waterfront flourished in the early nineteenth century as freight and passenger boats docked there on their way to Manhattan.” The village became a major center for shipbuilding producing many “vessels of large tonnage” each year. Hundreds of inhabitants were also engaged in the oyster trade. The ferry connections also prompted the development of small summer resorts, restaurants, hotels, and other recreation businesses.

In 1860, Tottenville became the western terminus for the new Staten Island Railroad, establishing an important link between the developing village and the rest of the island. This spurred the growth of the commerce in the village. According to the Handbook and Business Directory of Staten Island, published in 1870, “many handsome dwellings and stores” were erected and “evidences of [the village’s] prosperity were visible in all its surroundings.” During the subsequent decade, the Tottenville post office was established and the village was officially incorporated, the only one chartered on the island

free plantation shutter plans

free plantation shutter plans

Faux Wood Plantation Shutters 46"x46", Interior Shutters by AmericanBlinds
Will be discontinued American Blinds Polywood Plantation Shutter are custom made in just 7 days and they’re 25% less expensive than custom-sized wood shutters. Since these window shutters are not made of wood, cleaning is as simple as using a damp cloth or sponge without fear of harming the satin finish. Highly resistant to moisture and damage, use our faux wood shutters in your bathroom or anywhere kids or pets are especially active. Impressive quality with a Lifetime Warranty. Most come to you fully assembled, with all mounting hardware and easy-to-follow installation instructions; so our shutters are easy to install. They are available in inside (L-Frame or Z-frame; see gallery for image of Z-Frame) or outside mount, 2-1/2″” or 3-1/2″” louvers. These faux wood plantation shutters bring you the beauty of custom window shutters at an affordable price! Lifetime Limited Warranty. About 25% less expensive than custom-sized wood shutters. Custom-made in 7 business days. Easy to install. Use ordinary household tools. Most come fully assembled. Low maintenance; never requires painting. Resists moisture; easy to clean with just soap and water. Will not fade, crack, peel, or warp. Color shown in picture is Daisy White 900. Money saving tip: Each shutter order incurs a $70 oversize fee, so save money by ordering all your shutters at one time!

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